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Tuesday, 25 March 2014

Cookie or Krumkake?

The KEY to a good post is finding an image that looks and sounds KORRECT correct.  Our language sometimes does't help much!  How do you distinguish between the sounds of "C" and "K" or even an occasional "Q"??  CAT or KITTEN  or even CAKE/COOKIE or KRUMKAKE? See what I mean?  So you must be alert and KWICK quick to find a photo or two that both looks good and sounds good, and which is also KORRECT correct.  But remember, it's only "K" for today!!

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13 comments:

  1. It's hard for kids to differentiate K and C sounds.

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  2. I think the English language is one of the most complex languages in the universe....or is it 'Komplex'....no that doesn't look right !

    Di.x

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  3. Whether with a "C" or "K" it's still SWEEET!!! Wishing you all a great week.

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  4. This is the same in my mother tongue, many English or French words beginning with C have a translation in Dutch of words beginning with K.
    Cookie= Koek, cat=kat, cow = koe, cold= koud, card= kaart, and all initial K's are pronounced as K.
    Good introduction!

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  5. Great introduction. I think it's very confusing the way letters and sounds don't always match up.

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  6. Wonderful take for the intro today! I was stymied until the very last minute and threw together a K post!

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  7. Very nice but now I want a cookie and a krumkake!

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  8. whatever the image is, I wanna bite!

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  9. Hi! Nice capture. There are no words start from C,V,Fand Q in our country. Thanks for sharing.

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  10. Thank you Kate, for hosting:)
    Here's my 'K':
    http://amitaag.blogspot.in/2014/03/kinetic.html

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  11. Thanks for hosting! Greetings from the great land Downunder, brought to you by what else but a KOALA!

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  12. My grandmother was born in Moss, Norway, and came to the US as a young child with her parents, immigrating through Ellis Island. She had a krumkake iron that was her mother's that was cast iron and had a ring that was used to suspend it over the opening in a wood stove. How I wish some of those old family treasures made it through the many moves of three generations. My Norwegian heritage comes out at Christmas in foods. Krumkake is one I love. - Margy

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